Is Honey Good For Diabetes?

According to a study that was published in 2013 in the Iranian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences, honey is a naturally occurring sweetener that has been used by humans for at least 8000 years as both a food and a medication. Honey was utilized as a remedy for wounds and digestive issues by the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, and Assyrians, as well as the Chinese. Honey has been used as a remedy for ulcers, eye issues, skin diseases, and constipation in traditional medical practice. According to the Mayo Clinic, these disorders are considered to be possible complications related to diabetic problems. But is honey healthy for those who have diabetes?

According to the findings of a clinical analysis published in Pharmacognosy Research in 2017, there is some evidence to indicate that honey may be helpful for managing and treating diabetes mellitus. However, a number of industry professionals, such as Dr. Regina Castro from the Mayo Clinic, do not believe that honey has any benefits over sugar. Honey, on the other hand, and processed, refined sugar do not have the same level of health benefits (or unhealthy). Even though they both alter blood sugar levels, their effects on blood sugar couldn’t be more different from one another (per Medical News Today). Which one should you choose to utilize then?

Honey had less influence on people with type 2 diabetes and type 1 diabetes than normal sugar did on their blood sugar levels, according to independent studies that were reported by Diet vs. Disease. One study evaluated the effects of honey, glucose, and sucrose (table sugar), on persons with type 2 diabetes. Honey came out on top in this comparison. Honey induced an even bigger initial surge than glucose or sucrose did, however, all three sweeteners were responsible for an increase in blood sugar levels. Despite this, honey caused a smaller decline in blood sugar levels than any of the other carbohydrates, and those levels remained lower. Honey had a lesser influence on persons with type 1 diabetes blood sugar levels compared to glucose and sucrose, according to the findings of another research.

Other research investigated the effects of incorporating honey into a diabetic person’s diet rather than attempting to use honey as a sugar substitute. Subjects with type 1 diabetes who took honey as a supplement saw improvements in their short-term blood sugar levels, according to the findings of a research that lasted for 12 weeks and was published in the Journal of Medicinal Food. According to Diet vs. Disease, however, a different trial that lasted for eight weeks indicated that adding honey boosted long-term blood sugar levels in those who had type 2 diabetes.

The moderate use of honey and sugar is recommended.

Honey has important elements such as vitamin C, calcium, potassium, and zinc, which are not found in sugar. These nutrients may be found in honey but not in sugar. However, according to WebMD, one tablespoon of honey has 64 calories, 17 grams of carbs, and 17 grams of sugars. Honey is a natural sweetener. Additional study is required to evaluate if the health advantages of honey exceed the potential dangers for diabetics. For the time being, diabetic patients who want to cut down on their sugar intake are encouraged to try honey instead, with the caveat that they should only consume it in small amounts. According to Medical News Today, honey is sweeter than sugar, which means that you may be able to use less honey to get the same level of flavor when cooking with honey. According to Castro of the Mayo Clinic, “If you think honey has a more pleasing flavor, by all means, use it. However, honey should only be used in little amounts. As part of your meal plan for diabetes, make sure you take into account the carbs that honey contains.”

Additional study is required to evaluate if the health advantages of honey exceed the potential dangers for diabetics. For the time being, diabetic patients who want to cut down on their sugar intake are encouraged to try honey instead, with the caveat that they should only consume it in small amounts. According to Medical News Today, honey is sweeter than sugar, which means that you may be able to use less honey to get the same level of flavor when cooking with honey. According to Castro of the Mayo Clinic, “If you think honey has a more pleasing flavor, by all means, use it. However, honey should only be used in little amounts. As part of your meal plan for diabetes, make sure you take into account the carbs that honey contains.”

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